Franchisees: What Are Your Belief Mishaps?

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This is an article written by Sybil R Smith who is a Life Relationship Coach from Kingsport, TN. Make sure to visit her website.

I chose to publish this article here (with a modified title) because it emphasizes the power of beliefs in our lives. Belief is one of the elements contributing to success, as I explain in my book Franchise Success: The New Formula. Franchisees and franchisors who belief they will be successful, are so. Unfortunately, those who don’t belief they can be successful won’t be either. We all self-fulfil our prophecies with our beliefs and thoughts. I hope you enjoy Sybil’s article.

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Beliefs are formed when we are very young; usually before the age of 6. Fairy tales teach us to believe there is a happily ever after out there waiting for us. Extracurricular activities teach us to believe in ourselves. Our parents teach us to believe that we are worth loving. Our teachers help us believe that education is the way to enlightenment. Well, this is what these people are supposed to teach us to believe.

Along the way, though, we get confused. We create assumptions out of beliefs. We create complexity out of simplicity. Healthy beliefs turn into unhealthy habits. Some beliefs that are meant to be temporary are carried along into adulthood – because nobody told us we can re-evaluate what we believe along the way.

For example, as a toddler, I was told that people go to school until they are in their 20’s and finish at least one level of college. My parents did this for me to encourage me to value education and to reach a high level of achievement in the career of my choice. The thing is, I assumed – believed – that going to college was not a choice, but a requirement. I went. I had a good time. I did well. And then, during my last semester, I realized that I did not have to go! It never dawned on me to take a moment, step back and evaluate my belief. It had become an assumption. It was not my parents’ fault for allowing me to believe this; I just failed to reevaluate my situation until time to graduate.

I call these “Belief Mishaps.”

The way we discover these belief mishaps is to evaluate our current belief system. The evaluation process is not a simple one. I wish I could say, “Do steps one through three and you will achieve enlightenment.” Evaluating your belief system is a life-long process. It takes time, commitment, openness, and desire to change.

You can do several things to encourage the process in your life.

1. Set an intention to explore your beliefs.

Start with a simple openness or curiosity and see what unravels. Write it down. Draw it out. Sing it. Find a form of expression that gets the intention out of your head and into your senses.

I want to know about myself in a deep way. I am open to change. I want to find the reasoning behind my beliefs. I am curious. What beliefs have I turned into assumptions? Which beliefs are holding be back from a full and authentic life?

2. Surround yourself with people who are aware of their beliefs.

Find a new friend who knows their “why” of life. Hang out with old friends or family who have walked the walk. Find people who will expand your perspective. Step outside your box. Hire a coach, talk to a therapist, or seek spiritual counsel. Ask questions like this:

What makes you…? Who influenced your…? What created your life…? When did you decide…? Where did you learn…? Why do you…? How did you get here?

3. Seek growth experiences to explore your beliefs.

My favorite way of evaluating my beliefs is through new experiences. For an introvert like me, there is nothing like walking into a totally new environment filled with new faces to challenge the box I have put myself in. The walls get pushed and pulled in new directions until I find a new set of walls to rest in – for a while.

Go to a retreat – with strangers. Going with your friends only strengthens your current box and belief system. Experience a new form of spiritual practice or worship. Walk in someone else’s shoes for a day. Do the one thing you hate.

Take an awareness class, like the one I offer at the Creative Reflections Seminar Series. This series is designed to help you see another side to yourself, expand your box, and develop a fuller more authentic life.

Once you have started the awareness Journey, there may be bumps and jiggles along the way. It is ok. It is all a part of The Journey. Think of them as new opportunities for growth. There will always be more to learn about your beliefs.

As a side note, the second time I attended college – for my Master’s degree – I made a deliberate conscious decision to attend. I chose my school. I chose my degree. I decided that the belief I held as a young child was a good one for me. It was a great and powerful experience.

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Sybil R Smith is a Life Relationship Coach who works with individuals and families to help bring hope, health, and harmony to their life through coaching, encouragement, accountability, and specialized creative arts psychotherapy. You can contact her at info@sybilrsmith.com or visit her website  at www.sybilRsmith.com.